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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 325 (some duplicates have been removed)
if we had a little more that in washington, d.c. today and a little less of what we have. >> what do we have now? >> and overgrown city with too many politicians and lobbyists and consultants and media. seven out of the 10 richest counties in the united states, metropolitan washington, is the capital that cannot produce. it is the country that is still great with capital that is not. >> who in 1775 whatever predicted this? >> i suspect some of them were pretty cynical about politics. if you ever had an idea there would be a country of 300 million people with a capital that would have its finger on everything in the world, they might have been able to come up with a little pcynicism about that. >> said during the last years of the campaign of 2012, you started. >> the first time i did something like that was in the 1990's. i wrote a book about the english-speaking civil wars. the english revolution, the american revolution, and the american civil war. i did that because i cannot stand the idea of thinking about it bill clinton and newt gingrich too much. nice to take a vacation from thos
, metropolitan washington, it is the country did is still great but a capital that is not. would have predicted that? >> if anyone would have guessed that there would be a country of 300 million people, they may wouldn't come up with a bit of cynicism. but they were dedicated people. >> you say, during the last four years, during the campaign of 2012, you stuck your nose at this. >> the first time i did something like that was back in the 1990's. i wrote a book about the english speaking civil wars, the american revolution. i did it thinking about bill clinton and newt gingrich. it was nice to take a vacation from those guys. when i ran out of gas writing books about politics and economics, which i did a number of between 2002 and 2008, and said it is time to go back in history again. hop in my time capsule and forget about these fellows. and i have forgotten about them pretty well. i cannot remember, for example, the name of the governor of texas who was such a jerk in the primary. [laughter] effect that he could not remember the departments in the government, i guess it is a little forgivable
the department of justice or the federal district court in washington, d.c. so, the state of florida, for an example, never sought to get clearance to purge. and they're hiding behind there may be fraud. that's their own. amy goodman: you were on that selma to montgomery march. this. can you explain what happened, as we go back, what, almost half a century now? rep. john lewis: on march 7, 1965, a group of us attempted to march from selma to montgomery, alabama, to dramatize to the nation that people wanted to register to vote. one young african-american man had been shot and killed a few days earlier, in an adjoining county called perry county-this is in the black belt of alabama-the home county of mrs. martin luther king jr., the home county of mrs. ralph abernathy, the home county of mrs. andrew young. and because of what happened to him, we made a decision to march. in selma, alabama, in 1965, only 2.1 percent of blacks of voting age were registered to vote. the only place you could attempt to register was to go down to the courthouse. you had to pass a so-called literacy test. a
-winning reporting and analysis covering history as it happens. live from our nations capitol, this is washington week with gwen ifill, produced in association with national journal. corporate funding for washington week is provided by -- ♪ >> wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >> we know why we're here. to charlotte a greater path, in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding is provided by prudential additional funding is also provided by the annenberg financial. foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. its hard to believe, but weve been here before. first, negotiators pledge to work together then they test what the other
, courtesy of the newseum in washington, as this headline -- some schools are closed in the state so teachers can also protests that block today. here is the detroit news. there headline -- michigan pro-union people are protesting this law. the republican-led legislature is expected to take it up today. this legislation would bar workers from being required to pay union fees as a condition of employment even as thousands of union members plan to protest at the state capital. the story continues inside the new york times. we are getting your take on this this morning. start dialing in now. the wall street journal editorial page, they weigh in on the issue this morning. you can tell this is a big deal, based on the fury of big labor's reaction. edie in greenville, south carolina, democratic caller. is it eddie? i'm sorry. good morning. caller: good morning. i live in a work state and does not benefit the employer is at all. a company just moved into it charleston, boeing. they had the first test flight or three months ago on the 787. that was catastrophic. the wheel well caught on fire. other t
on washington. he has been arrested more than 40 times and has just written a new book called across that vision for change. he visited us in our studio, and i asked congressmember lewis about the voter purge in florida, where the justice department had sued to block republican governor rick scott's controversial effort to remove thousands of registered voters from the rolls, using an outdated drivers' license database to ostensibly identify non-citizens registered to vote. rep. john lewis: it is unreal, it is unbelievable, that at this time in our history, 47 years after the voting rights act was passed and signed into law, that we're trying to go backward. i think there is a systematic, deliberate attempt on the part of so many of these states-not just florida, but it's all across the country, it's not just southern states-to keep people from participating. i think there is an attempt to steal this election before it even takes place, to make it hard, to make it difficult for our seniors, for our students, for minorities, for the disabled to participate in the democratic process. it's not righ
nothing we couldn't do and today looking at the fiscal charade in washington, nothing we can do. >> welcome, i'm neil cavuto and 40 years after man left the lunar surface, politicians barely scratching the surface. >> 20 years after the astronauts made the impossible, possible. finger pointing spend thrifts who make the possible, impossible. how did we go from reaching for the stars to reaching to the other guy's throats. the astronauts who went to the moon and here for yourself, a jaw dropping special, it's a rare tv first in which we were granted unprecedented access to never before seen footage and exclusive interviews with the men who got us there. i don't want to give away the entire special, i do want to give you this little tidbit from it. that i think speaks volumes today. heroes who didn't see themselves as heroes at all. >> you're not thinking about what goes wrong, worry is a wasted emotion, it clouds clear thinking that is absolutely needed when something goes wrong. >> people say, boy, you've got a lot of guts, i didn't have juts, i knew what i was doing, i didn't g
washington dc. from all over the country, there were outpouring of condolences and sympathy and there were senators and congressmen who sent out statements calling for gun control. in some cases with o political decisions by many to politicize the tragedy. here are somef their names and what they said. congressman bobby rush said lawmakers can no longer be held hostage by those who are opposed to reasonable gun control laws. congressman eliot engel of new york, the fact that we cannot pass sensible gun control in this congress is a blot on her reputation. and congressmen jerry nadler saying that now is not the time to have a serious discussion about and control, if not now, when would it be? at least 20 members of congress reacting with calls to restrict constitutional rights to bear arms. all over those calls coming from members of the democratic party. here is the number who chose to talk about mental illness. the disaffection of the mentally disturbed and ill. the importance of a strong family and how better to protect our schools, the burnable and helpless children with in those classr
raggedly for the "washington post" and our website is rachelscox.com. and this is her first book. "into dust and fire: five young americans who went first to fight the nazis." this is booktv on c-span2. >> with about one month left in 2012, many publications are putting out their year-end lists of notable books. booktv will feature several of these lists focusing on nonfiction selections. these nonfiction titles were included in the "washington post" best books of 2012. >> for a link visit booktv's website, booktv.org or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> you may recognize garrett peck from a former bookie did on probation in washington, d.c. is back at local history with a new book on the potomac river, a history and guide. what does the potomac river start and end of? >> it is near davis west virginia, a tiny little trickle that comes out of the side of the mountain and then it ends at point a look at which is 11 miles wide. the river is pretty wide at the mouth in between there's a huge amount of history. hundreds of historic sites. this is where our nation grew up on. it al
laid back new year's celebration ever? no. celebration of washington state's brand new pot law. yes, they're smoking joints. >>> i dare you, like double dare you. obama administration bites and says, yeah, we're prepared to go off the fiscal cliff. >>> roger goodell, the commissioner football fans love to hate. there's a softer, gentler side of goodell. seriously. the nfl commissioner you don't know. "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning. thank you so much for joining me. i'm carol costello. smoke 'em if you got 'em. recreational marijuana is officially legal in washington state. shall we say a rather mellow celebration at seattle's space needle? pot smokers lit up like it was new year's eve. new voter approved initiative went into effect midnight. this pot party technically, is illegal. wz's law bans smoking pot in public places. for now the seattle police department is turning a blind eye. this notice was sent to all officers last night. until further notice officers shall not take any enforcement action, other than to issue a verbal warning, for a violation of initiative 502. m
, john harris, kelly o'donnell, michelle caruso-cabrera and david ignatius with "the washington post." first up, will president obama convince republicans to give him a compromise that's big enough, sweeping enough to end this month on a high note? to cap off his election win and get a clean start on his second term. a victory for the president would look like this -- get that top income tax rate up. make minimal concessions on entitlement cuts and get it done before the end of this month, avoid that cliff. this week the president said talk on a partial deal on taxes alone will not cut it with him. >> there have been reports that perhaps the republicans go ahead and let the middle class tax cuts get extended, the upper income tax cuts go up, otherwise we don't get a deal and next year we come back. i have to just tell you, that's -- that is a bad strategy for america. it's a bad strategy for your businesses, and it is not a game that i will play. chris: he wants a pretty good deal, a lot of things in it. when he sits down in that room with he and boehner, it's come down to the two of
demonstrations tomorrow? we'll be talking with fox news middle east expert while ferris in washington institute fellow eric trager, and president obama back on the campaign trail continuing to successfully dress up his ultimatum on higher taxes as a republican decision rather than his own declaration. his staff organized a sit-down with a middle class family today in virginia claiming congress is to blame p they fail to yield to his ultimatum. why is the mainstream liberal media ignoring the reality it's the president's ultimatum driving us to the fiscal cliff? chris and senior writer for the weekly standard, steven hayes the guests here tonight. we begin with the dictator trying to maintain command of the country using chemical weapons as a deterrent. fox news chief washington correspondent james rosen has the latest for us in this report. >> a regime helicopter captured in the skies in syria in a video unloads something, most likely, a defensive flair to detour antirebel runners, but that epitomizes the fear of which the serian people now live. rebel forces taking the flight to the assad regi
of washington today as jim demint the informal leader of the senate tea party caucus announced his resignation. he is going to step down and into the director's chair at the conservative think tank the heritage foundation. that position not only allows him to shape the conservative agenda from the outside. it also comes with a pretty significant raise. demint now makes $174,000 a year. he's got an estimated net worth of $65,000. so he's actually the fourth poorest senator right now according to open secrets. but at heritage he's going to pull down a cool estimated million dollar salary. he told rush limbaugh that it's about principles not dollars, saying quote, i believe that i can do more good for the conservative movement outside of the senate. of course he has done a lot for the movement inside the senate because through his senate conservative fund he has cultivated a whole host of tea partyers including tea party senators like ron johnson, mike lee, marco rubio, pat toomey rand paul geoff flake, geoff fisher. perhaps his worst was backing tod
turn it into politics. and that is what appears to be the case right now in washington, d.c. >> but, sir, politics have a huge influence in this, as we look at the nra which is large lobbying group for gun manufacturers that has supported -- they support you. you have an "a" rating from them. you have voted yes on promoting gun sellers and manufacturers. and yes on the waiting periods taking waiting periods from 72 hours to one day yes on a trigger lock law in washington, d.c. how can you say politics are not involved with this when you look at a voting record right there. the nra gives you an "a" in allowing for people like an adam lanza to have access to the weapons he might have had. his mother might have had it legally, but we cannot police what his mother is doing inside that house to keep lanza away from those weapons. >> yes, and none of the policy issues which you just ticked off would have prevented adam lanza from doing this. and it is very sad that we want to cloud the issue by making nra the policy, as opposed to adam lan za and what triggers this. think of germany, germ
, connecticut. nearly all of the senators and congress have left washington dc. from all over the country, there were outpouring of condolences and sympathy and there were senators and congressmen who sent out statements calling for gun control. in some cases with no political decisions by many to politicize the tragedy. here are some of their names and what they said. congressman bobby rush said lawmakers can no longer be held hostage by those who are opposed to reasonable gun control laws. congressman eliot engel of new york, the fact that we cannot pass sensible gun control in this congress is a blot on her reputation. and congressmen jerry nadler saying that now is not the time to have a serious discussion about and control, if not now, when would it be? at least 20 members of congress reacting with calls to restrict constitutional rights to bear arms. all over those calls coming from members of the democratic party. here is the number who chose to talk about mental illness. the disaffection of the mentally disturbed and ill. the importance of a strong family and how better to protect
again, most of washington says thank goodness. \[laughter] but i'm excited about what's going on today. the only thing or one of the few things i worried about when i was considering leaving the senate was who would replace me, because i knew governor haley would put someone in this seat that we would all be proud of and would continue to stand for those principles of freedom and opportunity that i've worked on while i was in the senate. so governor, thank you for your faithfulness to our cause and for your good judgment. and tim, i could not be happier today. and i appreciate the compliments. but i can walk away from the senate knowing that someone is in this seat that is better than i am, that will carry that voice of opportunity conservativism to the whole country in a way that i couldn't do. i'm going to keep working for that cause, but i can tell you, tim, you've inspired me since the first time i heard you speak in public. and our country needs those positive, optimistic voices right now to encourage people that there is a way out of this quagmire we're in in washington. you've g
in fort washington. the men shot the homeowner. tony tull live at the scene with more. >> reporter: good morning, aaron. scary situation for a family here around 2:00 this morning. as you mentioned, a home invasion. multiple suspects barged into the house demanded cash and jewelry. the homeowner, a gentleman in his 40s confronted those suspects and he was shot in the back. i want to give you a sense of the scene right now. multiple police units are here on scene doing investigation. you can see that right front window where the blinds are kind of messed up. that is where the situation took place. now, the suspects, we are being told, did get away. but police are still trying to gather clues here. i want to bring in mr. leonard parker. you are the brother-in-law of the victim. >> my wife got a phone call this morning arod about 3:30 saying that my brother-in-law got shot. somebody invaded the home. demanded money, demanded cash. he got shot in the back. >> seems to be a very quiet neighborhood. your sister-in-law as well as your 16-year-old niece was in the house. they're okay o. but does
mint surprised a lot of people today when he announced he is leaving the senate. but staying in washington to run the conservative heritage foundation think tank. he joins us tonight. >> great to be with you. >> bret: why are you doing it? >> if you look at the 2012 election, apparent that the conservatives need to do more to convince americans that ideas will make the lives better. unfortunately in the senate what we have to do is point out bad policy with the president. that is important job. my background is research and marketing to people. to leverage their assets to communicate to all americans we can make their lives bette better, this is a dream job for me. klitcally important. i don't think the republicans will win another national election unless conservatives convince americans the principles will work. then libertarians and independents and democrats can embrace the conservative ideas if americans believe they're the real solutions. >> bret: what do you say to the constituents who say he was my guy? >> i am still that guy. what i have done like help elect good con seventive senators a
house correspondent dan lothian joins us live from washington this morning. very nice to see you, dan. >> good to see you. >> here's the deal. we have republicans pitted against democrats. now we understand there are issues amongst republicans as well. >> that's right. they're in a tough spot here. they don't want to be in left in a position of being blamed for the fiscal cliff. you're seeing a division between house members and senate members. the reason for this is mainly over the 800 billion in new tax revenue. this was part of john boehner and plan. those tea party-backed conservatives say this is something that would help job growth. clearly what we're seeing here is republicans are not speaking with one voice. >> republicans should not be conceding that the federal government needs more money, negotiating with ourselves and treating the president's proposal like it's serious. >> we do agree that 8% of the american people are getting about 80% of this tax cut shouldn't have their taxes raised. my suggestion was let's take the one area we agree and take it off the table. >> but zo
fired up. >> fired up. talk about fired up. for thousands of people in seattle and all across washington state, this day could not come soon enough. it is day one of legal recreational marijuana use. courtesy of the voters who passed a landmark referendum last month. from this day forward, if you are old enough to drink, you can consume as much as one ounce of pot in washington state but you still can't grow it and you still can't sell it. technically, you still can't buy it and you're not supposed to light up in public either. what are you all doing out there at that party? my colleague was there. he was on the not so mean streets when the law took effect. i'll be interested to find out what the absentee rate is at seattle workplaces today, miguel. >> reporter: i think most people are going to work here. it's not quite as crazy as that. it's cold and rainy. puts a damper on things. there were a lot of parties across the entire state and a lot of those issues you raised will be taken care of in the near future. last night was a night for celebration for these folks. >> four, three, two,
sequestration of the states. "washington >> mr. president, i rise with real heavy starter. our friend dan just died. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--] >> a democrat of hawaii, a highly decorated wofford war two combat veteran and the second longest senator in history died on monday. the senate passed a resolution naming patrick leahy as new president pro temps, the third in line to the presidency. good morning, everyone, on this tuesday, december 18, 2012, as senators say goodbye to their longtime colleague yesterday, they will be welcoming a new senator from the state of south carolina. and tim scott has been tapped to replace jim demint. and the papers reporting progress being made about the so-called fiscal cliff talk. first, we return to the tragedy to discuss mental health issue in this country. what should be the role of the federal and state government if any in mental health? also send us a tweet, twitter.com c-spanwj or facebook .com/c-span
, the majority of voters from both parties want washington to make it happen. joining me is south carolina congressman james clyburn. sir, good to have you here. we just heard nancy pelosi calls on congress not to leave the hill after a two-day work week. are republicans on the hill wanting to do the same thing, wanting to stay there and get this deal done? >> thank you so much for having me, thomas. yeah, i do believe we want to see the deal done. i've talked to a lot of republicans who feel that we ought to do this. before we go home. then come back next week for a day or so to rat that fi whatever it is to put in place. and then go home so that the holidays with our families and friends. so people want to see this done. they know pretty much what has to be done. and they would like to see us just do it. and get out of here. >> congressman, are the outs in the favor of this two-step process of getting something done that will save the majority of americans 98% from tax increases come the new year? is that mainly the game plan at this point, with time running down? >> well, i hope it is.
congress leave washington without taking care of these folks. >> john nichols, as always, thank you so very much, my friend. that's it for the ed show. ezra klein is filling in for rachel tonight. always good to see you, my friend. >> good to see you too, and happy friday. and thanks to you at home for sticking around for the next hour. rachel's got the night off, but we learned something huge today. we are going over the fiscal cliff. we are going either all the way over or going partly over, but we are definitely, definitely going over. that whole fiscal cliff thing, where congress and the white house can't reach a deal on taxes and spending before the end of the year and they maybe get us into a recession, it's definitely happening. that was the whole point of president obama's press conference this afternoon. >> i still want to get this done. it's the right thing to do for our families, for our businesses, and for our entire economy. but the hour for immediate action is here. it is now. >> allow me a quick update here. that press conference, it came after president obama met with john b
't happen in washingtoners it would make great television. right-to-work laws in michigan became the 24th state in the nation. it allows union workers to opt out of paying union dues even if they're not in the union. stephen moore, "wall street journal." who would be next? >> there are a number of states neighbors to michigan really looking at this legislation. i'll name a few to you, bill. pennsylvania, ohio, west virgina, states like that are competing against southern states. remember a lot of jobs and a lot of manufacturing has moved from the midwest, the kind of rust belt of america to the south in part because those southern states are right-to-work. can i mention one other thing if i could, bill, about this issue that is important? bill: sure. >> there is so much misinformation what it means to be a right-to-work state. i want your viewers to know this, if you're a right-to-work state it does not ban unions, bill. simply means that workers who work for a unionized company have the right as an individual to join the union or not. it does not ban unions. bill: to be more specific, if
the department of homeland security program that gives money to recover from a terrorist incident. "washington journal," is next. [video clip] >> we cannot tolerate this any more. these tragedies must end. we must change, to end them. host: president obama at last night's interfaith prayer vigil in newtown, connecticut, speaking to the community hit by friday's elementary school shootings. it's monday, december 17, 2012. the president offered words of solidarity and state and pledged to use the power of the presidency and to prevent future killings. some are asking whether that is an indication on whether he will push for stronger gun control laws. question for you is and should u.s. gun laws change? here are the numbers to call -- you can also find us online. send us a tweet or join the conversation on facebook, or send us an e-mail. our question for you is whether u.s. gun laws should change? here's the headline in "usa today" -- jumping down into the story, it says -- others are exploring the question of gun laws. we will hear some comments from members of congress this morning. congression
. host: that is a shot of the union station in weiss did, d.c. -- in washington, d.c.. we will take a look at politics and the year in foreign policy. we want to hear from you about your political hero. why he or she deserves the honor? your political hero of 2012. you can give us a call this morning. host: you can reach out on social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter.com/cspanwj. we have about 15 comment so far. you can send this e-mail that journal@c-span.org. your political hero for the first 45 minutes. here are some thoughts on facebook and twitter. this is from jonathan espinoza. about 15 comments on facebook already. danny likes bernie sanders. host: just some of the mansion's this morning. entions some of the mansi this morning. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independents. also on facebook, facebook.com/cspan. a couple of stories related to the fiscal cliff. from "thew bid frittle bit washington times." this is ron from louisiana. caller: good morning. host: who wish to nominate? -- who would you'll
many days and nights alone as i have tried to come up here and change things in washington. she's often reminded me or questioned how i thought i could change the world, when i couldn't even mow the grass. but she has been a supporter and certainly so important, as i left my children who were still in school and i began serving in the house, kept them on the right track. and i particularly want to thank them. all of you who served here know that when we sign up for public life we also sign our families up for public life. in a lot of ways it makes their lives much more difficult. so i want to thank my children, my wife, debbie, and family for putting up with this and being such a support. i also have to thank the people of south carolina who have entrusted me with this job in the senate for the last eight years and in the house six years before that. all of you know who served for your states. as you've traveled around and met people, toured businesses and spoken to groups, it really creates a deep love and appreciation for people back home. i look at what we're making in south carolina
of marriage act and california's proposition 8. nbc's pete williams joins us now from washington with all the latest details. good evening, pete. >> reporter: good evening, larry. the vilma case is the easier one. federal law signed into law by president clinton in 1996. it says if a person is legally married in a state, the federal government can't recognize those marriages. that's where you talked about federal benefits heterosexual couples get and same sex couples do not. the prop 8 thing is bigger. while potentially it's confined to the state of california only, the question it out there having given the right to gay marriage could the state then take it away through proposition 8 passed by a majority of the vote nurse 2008. having taken that case, the court could get to the bedrock issue. can any state refuse to let same sex couples get married under the federal constitution. it could potentially be narrow or very far. >> pete, as i understand it, let me ask you. this one of these things, maybe the driving one, is defense of marriage act was about paying the estate act. where one of
by chicago tribune columnist clarence page. live recalls, tweets, an e-mail. "washington journal" is next. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] h., congress returns later this week to washington with eight days to go to avoid the so- called fiscal cliff. two republican senators on the sunday talk shows yesterday say they agree with the president's position that both sides should avoid tax hikes on middle-class americans. also, nra executive said the group would not support any new gun laws in this country. good morning this monday, december 24, 2012. we will begin this morning with your thoughts on religion and politics. as a religion influence your political decisions? also send us your tweet if you go to twitter.com -- we will begin with the sunday review section of the "the new york times" yesterday. we want to get your take on this. it does religion influence your politics? with more people saying they are unaffiliated. we want to get your take. here are some comments from facebook this morning. what are your
to repeat. you know, outside of washington, nobody understands how it is that this seems to be a repeat pattern, over and over again. ordinary folks, they do their jobs. they meet deadlines. they sit down and they discuss things and things happen. if there are disagreements, they sort through the disagreements. the notion that our elected leadership can't do the same thing is mind boggling to them. and needs to stop. >> i just have to repeat, congress, you are terrible at your jobs. i really don't like working with you. we're going to talk a bit later in the show about everybody hates congress and what we can do about that. but as much as the public hates congress, you really get the feeling that congress' approval rating among president obama is in the neighborhood of negative 75,000 percent. and yes, numbers geeks, not a real number. but he seems really tired of working with these people. but there is a way in which congress, and particularly congressional republicans may actually be helping president obama out right now. everybody's always known two things about the cliff. you're alm
to washington. >> we need to make difficult decisions. often we have conversations about how to create enough revenue to solve the problem. i learned early in my 20s if you have a problem with spending there's not enough revenue to make up for it. we have a spending problem, ladies and gentlemen in america. knotted a revenue -- not a revenue problem. >> he expects to be sworn in on january 3rdrd. once scott give >> thank you. a quick programming note both senate tim scott and nikki haley will join greta van susteren on tonight's on the record at 10:00 p.m. eastern. why secretary of state clinton is not testifying about benghazi this week. it says politics makes strange bed fellows. case in point energy exports next. copd makes it hard to breathe, but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers fo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 325 (some duplicates have been removed)